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wasted potential

RP - the only way to change the corporations getting away from taxes is to change the tax code fundamentally. The current system affords special interests a far greater voice than the individual wage earner or small business. I will also say that no one can demonize this issue left or right, as politicians on both sides are feeding at the trough of special interest tax breaks.

President Bush has stated that he will fundamentally change the tax code if re-elected. I personally favor a flat tax with no write offs or loop holes, save the exception for charity/religios giving. I think it is in the country's best interest to encourage giving to those institutions.

John Kerry only wants to tax the rich, of which I aspire to become one day:)

wasted potential

RP - what sort of blood oath to you have to give to get on that website?:)

RocketPunch

wasted - you don't need to change the tax-code to close loop holes in the existing codes. Bush has turned a blind eye to corporations allowing them to exploit. Certainly, you can't argue against Bush's support for large energy companies and such. His environmental record is the biggest proof to his priorities in this area.

RocketPunch

wasted - lol, none. There is no log-in needed to browse the website.

wasted potential

RP - the tax code is not as simple as you might think. Special interest groups get small, unnoticed shelters/loop holes from Congress, not the President. Each Congressman/Senator has a reason to do this - campaign contributions, hometown pork, promises of jobs for their constituents, etc ... One thing that I have always been disappointed in is that freshmen Republicans go to Washington promising to slash pork and close loopholes, but their first re-election, they have been in essence, bought off by the special interests.

These corporations aren't stupid, the give money to both sides so that they can win either way. I think simplifying the tax code will be more difficult than anything else proposed, due to special interests.

By the way, what do you think of the line-item veto? I actually believe it would help to reduce pork and loop holes, irregardless of who the President is. I would have supported Clinton having it.

RocketPunch

wasted - oh, I know it isn't simple. I honestly don't pretend to understand it. One of my business partners worked for the IRS. He deals with all of our taxes. :) I really have no right talking in any depth outside of the Bush tax cuts, which I have studied up on. Also, corporations and taxes goes well beyond the tax code. Government has a big hand. Example - we had a major problem here in Florida where outdoor gun ranges were getting hit for polluting the ground with lead. The clean-up was in the millions. The NRA made a call to Jeb and, like magic, tax payers became responsable for the clean-up of outdoor gun ranges!! W did the same thing with energy companies. I could go on with this but I have to get up for a second .... brb

RH

Joe Biden.... LMAO .... no comments... LOL ... as the Governator would say ..... I don't want no girly men for my security......

annie


"As son of a Republican president, Dwight D. Eisenhower, it is automatically expected by many that I am a Republican. For 50 years, through the election of 2000, I was. With the current administration's decision to invade Iraq unilaterally, however, I changed my voter registration to independent, and barring some utterly unforeseen development, I intend to vote for the Democratic presidential candidate, Sen. John Kerry."
-- Ambassador John Eisenhower, endorsing Kerry in an opinion piece published in The Manchester Union Leader, September 28, 2004.
"The two 'Say No to Bush' signs in my yard say it all. The present Republican president has led us into an unjustified war -- based on misguided and blatantly false misrepresentations of the threat of weapons of mass destruction. The terror seat was Afghanistan. Iraq had no connection to these acts of terror and was not a serious threat to the United States, as this president claimed, and there was no relation, it's now obvious, to any serious weaponry. Although Saddam Hussein is a frightful tyrant, he posed no threat to the United States when we entered the war. George W. Bush's arrogant actions to jump into Iraq when he had no plan how to get out have alienated the United States from our most trusted allies and weakened us immeasurably around the world... This imperialistic, stubborn adherence to wrongful policies and known untruths by the Cheney-Bush administration -- and that's the accurate order -- has simply become more than I can stand."
-- Former Minnesota Governor Elmer Andersen, a Republican, endorsing Kerry in an opinion piece published in the Minneapolis Star-Tribune, October 13, 2004. Andersen argued in the piece that, "I am more fearful for the state of this nation than I have ever been -- because this country is in the hands of an evil man: Dick Cheney. It is eminently clear that it is he who is running the country, not George W. Bush."
"The Bush George W. Bush has come to embody a politics that is antithetical to almost any kind of thoughtful conservatism. His international policies have been based on the hopelessly naive belief that foreign peoples are eager to be liberated by American enemies -- a notion more grounded in Leon Trotsky's concept of global revolution than any sort of conservative statecraft."
-- Scott McConnell, executive editor, The American Conservative, endorsing Kerry in the November 8, 2004 issue.
"I am not enamored with John Kerry, but I am frightened to death of George Bush. I fear a secret government. I abhor a government that refuses to supply the Congress with requested information. I am against a government that refuses to tell the country with whom the leaders of our country sat down and determined our energy policy, and to prove how much they want to keep the secret, they took it all the way to the Supreme Court."
-- Former U.S. Senator Marlow Cook, Republican from Kentucky, endorsing Kerry in an opinion piece that appeared in The Louisville Courier-Journal, October 20, 2004.
"My Republican Party is the party of Theodore Roosevelt, who fought to preserve our natural resources and environment. This president has pursued policies that will cause irreparable damage to our environmental laws that protect the air we breathe, the water we drink and the public lands we share with future generations."
-- Former Michigan Governor William Milliken, from a statement published in the Traverse City Record Eagle, October 17, 2004.
"As an environmentalist who served as chairman of the U.S. Senate Committee on Environment and Public Works, I know that this administration has turned environmental policy over to lobbyists for the oil, gas and mining interests. On the other hand, I know first-hand of your commitment to a more balanced approach to environmental policy -- one where we can have both jobs and profit for industry as well as clean air and water. There is no stronger evidence of this than your outstanding leadership and support in the restoration of the Florida Everglades. John, for each of these reasons I believe President Bush has failed our country and my party. Accordingly, I want you to know that when I go into the booth next Tuesday I am going to cast my vote for you."
-- Former U.S. Senator Bob Smith, Republican from New Hampshire, from an endorsement letter sent to John Kerry, October 28, 2004.
"Nixon was a prince compared to these guys."
-- Former U.S. Representative Pete McCloskey, R-California, from an article in the Palo Alto Weekly, September 8, 2004. McCloskey, who is active with Republicans for Kerry, says of members of the Bush administration, "These people believe God has told them what to do. They've high jacked the Republican Party we once knew."

"The war is just a misbegotten thing that's spiraling down. It's a matter of conscience for me. After 9/11, the whole world was behind us. That's all gone now. That's been squandered. Now we've made the entire Muslim world hate us. And for what? For what?"
-- Former State Senator Al Meiklejohn, Republican from Colorado and World War II combat veteran, explaining his decision to support John Kerry in an interview with The Denver Post, September 19, 2004.

"We need a leader who is really dedicated to creating millions of high-paying jobs all across the country."
-- Former Chrysler chairman Lee Iacocca, who campaigned for George W. Bush in 20

RocketPunch

Good ol' Arnold. Barely a Republican by the Bush standards of the party.

Henry Schlatman

RH,
FYI: Our Sec. of State enforces and bargins with other countries.

It is Our Sec. of Defense that controls Our Troops. Therefore, I recommend Jesses Ventrua for the job.

Also, Homeland Security Sec. oversees in country protection and I recommend Senator McCain for the job. His insight and experience on the issues facing Our Country would lend a good hand in a Kerry Administration.

RocketPunch

Actually, I might have it mistaken. I think it is Sec. of Defense that Biden was offered - this is all rumor. For the record, Biden was sent to Iraq by Bush before the War to come up with a plan for securing the peace. Bush ignored every one of Biden's recommendations and now it is obvious that Biden was right and Bush, of course, was very very wrong.

Henry Schlatman

Rocket Punch,
Senator Biden seats on the forgien reletion committee so he would be/has been named as a candidate for Sec. of State. Although he has public reclined, I personally would like to see him get in the face of Our UN Officals.

RocketPunch

Agreed. Even my friends who don't like politics will watch a show if Biden is on. He has a great habit of getting right to the point and speaking in a spin-less way that is impossible to NOT understand. He has been my favorite spokeman for Democrats, by far. Him and McCain were great on Face the Nation yesterday.

RocketPunch

Damnit ... Greg Palast just posted an early report on the election and all it's potential flaws. It's not very encouraging.

http://www.gregpalast.com/detail.cfm?artid=389&row=0

wasted potential

I have always found Biden entertaining, but I disagree with most of his positions. That being said, he will get to hone his skills for a possible 2008 run at the presidency for 4 more years.

wasted potential

OK - I will check back sometime tomorrow night (if I don't fall asleep), as I said before, I hope we all vote and participate in this election.

Oh yeah, its good to be with my wife in kids tonight in Bush country, otherwise known as the buckeye state.

Henry Schlatman

RP,
Although I know that some monkey business is going on with both sides, I feel that "We the People" may have to ask the federal courts to step in and declare the presidential election unconstitutional if the two parties continue down this road.

And I feel that Congress needs to hold Open Congressional Hearings on charging those responsible for any tampering with Our Vote.

WP,
What positions of Biden do you disagree with?

RocketPunch

wasted - I doubt Biden will run. Didn't he get busted lying about something early in his career? I think we're looking for Obama 2012. By then our country should be economically strong with the war on terror streamlined in a more systematic way. We will be ready for someone who can inspire this nation to be strong on a cultural, social and spiritual level.

RocketPunch

Henry - I totally agree. All of us are and should be fed up. I am upset with Bush for not taking steps after 2000 to fix the problems on a national level. I will be upset for Kerry if he does the same. We need to get rid of the electoral. It serves NO purpose now.

Bill Evans

Wasted - Joe Lockhart, the day after the last debate, stated flatly what I asserted. It has been confirmed by other Kerry surrogates, including John Edwards the Sunday after the last debate. It really doesn't matter because even if Kerry is elected, he will not be able to enact tax increases in a Republican House of Representatives.

I don't know what you are looking at, but there is no doubt that Kerry wants to roll back the tax cuts on the top two marginal rates, which go all the way down to $87000.

BTW, the appeals court reversed the two lib judges who said observers were not allowed in the polling places in Ohio. We will be there bright tailed and bushy eyed at 6am.

I am looking forward to the experience, although I am sure it will be a verrrrry long day (at least 6am to 8pm depending on how long the lines are when the polls close and how long it takes to count the votes).

I have enjoyed the exchange of ideas. Have to hit the sack. Have a nice vote.

Jeffraham Prestonian

Bill Evans: "BTW, the appeals court reversed the two lib judges who said observers were not allowed in the polling places in Ohio. We will be there bright tailed and bushy eyed at 6am."

On my way now to Columbus, with Canon GL-1 in hand... happy Election Day, everyone!
.

Jeffraham Prestonian

Bill Evans -- I guess I'll hold off on the Columbus trip. No mention of the appeal going through on the wires yet. But hey, nice try. ;) I'll stay on that...
.

RocketPunch

Good luck guys. Keep everyone out there honest!

I was just watching my local news here in Florida. 13,000 votes were lost when a voting machine crashed. Tens of thousands of absentee ballots lost. This isn't going to be pretty. This is going to come around and kick Jeb in the ass come re-election time.

RocketPunch

LONDON (Reuters) - Oil prices fell sharply on Monday on speculation that a U.S. election win for Senator John Kerry could ease the geopolitical friction that has helped fuel this year's record-breaking rally.

U.S. light crude settled down $1.63 to $50.13 after diving as low as $49.30 a barrel, breaking below $50 the first time in nearly a month. U.S. crude peaked a week ago at $55.67 a barrel. In London, Brent crude lost $1.92 to $47.06 a barrel.

Energy analysts said a win for the challenger Kerry in Tuesday's U.S. presidential election could mean lower crude prices than if President Bush were reelected. Latest opinion polls can barely separate the two.

"Under a Kerry administration we'd likely have a much more interventionist SPR policy," said Jamal Qureshi, market analyst at PFC Energy in Washington. "And when you look out a bit further, Bush is more likely to be aggressive in the Middle East, particularly in Iran."

More...

http://story.news.yahoo.com/news?tmpl=story&cid=568&nci...

Bill Evans

It's been a long, hard campaign. Have some fun. Turn on NBC; Saturday Night live presidential special.

No matter who you hate, it's great.

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